Geography

The Lime Geography curriculum, in partnership with CUSP Geography, inspires in pupils a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives.  The Geography curriculum draws upon prior learning, wherever content is taught.  The structure is built around the principles of advancing cumulative knowledge, focusing on spaces, places, scale, human and physical processes with an emphasis on how content is connected and relational knowledge acquired. The teaching of Geography equips pupils with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. The Geography curriculum supports pupils with deepening their understanding of the interaction between physical and human processes and of the formation and use of landscapes and environments. 

The sequence in KS1 focuses young children to develop a sense of place, scale and an understanding of human and physical geographical features. Later in KS1, children learn about the purpose and use of sketch maps as well as the key features they need to include. Map skills and fieldwork are essential to support children in developing an understanding of how to explain and describe a place, the people who live there, its space and scale. Initially, children study the orientation of the world through acquiring and making locational sense of the 7 continents and 5 oceans of the world. They extend their knowledge and study the countries and capital cities of the United Kingdom, along with the oceans and seas that surround us. Throughout KS1, pupils enhance their locational knowledge by studying and identifying human and physical features of places. Pupils study the human and physical features of a non-European location in Africa, such as Nairobi. Fieldwork and map skills are further developed with a study of the local area, using cardinal points of a compass. Maps are introduced through familiar stories as a way to communicate what the place and space is like. Simple keys and features are identified and mapped locally to help begin to understand place, distance and scale.  

 As pupils begin KS2, fieldwork and map skills are revisited with the intercardinal points of a compass points being introduced to elaborate on the knowledge pupils already have around cardinal points. This substantive and disciplinary knowledge is utilised to support a study of the UK, focusing on regions, counties, landmarks and topography. Pupils elaborate and expand their understanding of human and physical features and apply it to the study of rivers. To enable accurate location of places around the globe, pupils study absolute positioning or reference systems through latitude and longitude. Substantive knowledge is acquired and used to apply their new understanding to mapping and locational skills. An in-depth understanding of latitude and longitude is used by pupils throughout KS2. Cultural awareness and diversity are taught specifically within learning modules. Examples include European studies, as well as studies of countries and people in Africa, and North and South America. A deliberately planned study focusing on the environmental regions of Europe, Russia, and North and South America draws attention to climate regions and is the precursor to studying biomes in UKS2. 

In upper Key stage 2, the study of Biomes and Environmental regions builds upon world locations, latitude and longitude studies. World countries and major cities are located, identified and remembered through deliberate and retrieval practice, such as low stakes quizzing and ‘two things’ tasks. The study of biomes is revisited deliberately to ensure the content is remembered and applied. In upper KS2, the study of 4 and 6 figure grid references supports prior learning of reference systems and brings an increased accuracy to mapping and fieldwork skills. Pupils take part in geographical analysis using patterns and comparison of both human and physical processes as well as the features present in chosen locations. This abstract concept is made concrete through studying and comparing the Lake District, the Tatra mountains of Poland and the Blue mountains of Jamaica. Physical processes such as orogeny and glaciation are acquired to explain significant change over long periods of time. The concept of physical process is revisited through a study of Earthquakes, mountains and volcanoes. Settlement, trade and economic activities are the focus of a study that draws upon the Windrush generation module studies in History. Disciplinary knowledge supports pupils to reason and explain the effect of change on a place, drawing on prior substantive knowledge they can retrieve and reuse. 

 

 

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Places now available for 3-4 year olds in our Little Larks Nursery!

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